Changes coming west of Parker

One of the first roadway bridges over Newlin Gulch was built in the shadow of Rueter-Hess Reservoir’s 185-foot dam. The reduced risk of a major flood will save the town millions of dollars because high-cost bridges can be replaced by less-expensive culverts. Photo by Chris Michlewicz
Chris Michlewicz
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Hundreds of acres of undeveloped land between Parker and Lone Tree will undergo major changes.

The Parker area’s housing market is showing new signs of life now that residential subdivisions like Meridian Village are getting a fresh look. The developer, Shea Homes, received county approval in September on a preliminary and final plat application to subdivide 360 acres into 381 lots for single-family homes and associated streets southwest of Mainstreet/Ridgegate Parkway and Chambers Road.

After rezoning the land from agricultural use to “urban planned development” in 2004, Shea Homes began building Meridian Village piece by piece, beginning with what was then known as Sierra Ridge. However, construction noticeably slowed down when the housing market began to enter its slump in 2008. Meridian Village Parkway, a north-south collector street that leads into the subdivision from Lincoln Avenue, opened in 2007.

A sketch plan allowing for 900 homes was approved earlier this year in planning area C of Meridian Village, the residential portion of the Meridian International Business Center Planned Development. More than 860 residential units — all of them on the north side of Ridgegate Parkway in unincorporated Douglas County — have been built out of the 2,500 that are approved for planning area C.

An elementary school, fire station and parks are included in long-term plans. A limited amount of commercial use is permitted, and roughly 32 percent of the development will be designated open space once it’s completed, according to application documents.

Shea Homes has not yet applied for building permits, but has received all of the necessary approvals to move forward, said Brett Thomas, county planner.

At full build-out, the entire development will require 4,057 acre-feet of water per year, according to the Colorado Division of Water Resources. The Meridian Metro District has 4,400 acre-feet of water, including 3,100 acre-feet of non-tributary Denver Basin ground water.

The State Engineers Office deemed the water supply “adequate,” but warned that based on the number of existing wells, the Denver Basin water supply may last less than 100 years because of anticipated water level declines.

“The State Engineers Office does not have evidence regarding the length of time for which this source will be a physically and economically viable source of water,” said a referral letter dated June 7.

Meridian will be able to reuse its available supply via water treatment methods.

The Grandview Estates Homeowners Association responded to a referral request with concerns regarding storm runoff and Meridian agreed to pay about $103,000 for drainage improvements. The Stonegate Owners Association noted concerns with the predicted traffic increases and water supply.

Heirloom and Regency

Construction activity is happening in the shadow of Rueter-Hess Dam, just to the east of the latest proposed portion of Meridian Village.

Heirloom, a subdivision now being built west of Chambers Road by Standard Pacific Homes, is being advertised as a “neighborhood you can love for a lifetime.”

One enclave, known as the “Porchlight Collection,” will contain 60 homes with four different floor plans ranging in size from 2,300 to 3,100 square feet. They are priced from the mid-$300,000s to the low $400,000s. The “Porchlight Collection” will be adjacent to “Heirloom — Summerfield Collection,” which has slightly more than 100 homes priced from the low $400,000s to the high $400,000s. 

Next door is another Standard Pacific Homes development known as Regency, which has five floor plans ranging from 1,667 to 2,751 square feet. The energy efficient homes are “thoughtfully designed for today’s buyer” and priced from the $280,000s, according to the developer’s website.

 

Meridian Village, by the numbers:

Number of homes for this filing: 381

Acres: 360

Lot sizes: 5,610

Percentage of land as open space: 32

Total homes allowed in Meridian: 2,500

Number of homes built so far: 860