Douglas County

School district's pay-for-performance suspended for one year

School board unanimously approves the recommendation

Posted 9/20/17

The seven members of the Douglas County School Board approved suspending the differentiated pay structure for licensed teachers and administrators for one year at the Sept. 19 board meeting.

Suspending the pay-for-performance structure for the …

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Douglas County

School district's pay-for-performance suspended for one year

School board unanimously approves the recommendation

Posted

The seven members of the Douglas County School Board approved suspending the differentiated pay structure for licensed teachers and administrators for one year at the Sept. 19 board meeting.

Suspending the pay-for-performance structure for the 2017-18 school year gives teachers and administrators the chance to review and share their opinions about a revised teacher evaluation rubric developed over the past year, Steve Colella, the district's chief of human resources, said at a Sept. 5 board meeting, when the recommendation to suspend differentiated pay for a year was made to the school board.

The recommendation follows “challenges” created by the simultaneous implementation of teacher evaluations and a differentiated pay system, Colella said.

In the 2012-13 school year, the school district implemented a teacher evaluation called CITE and an administrator evaluation called LEAD. The evaluation systems are required in all Colorado school districts under 2010's Senate Bill 191, also called the Educator Effectiveness Bill.

The district also implemented a differentiated pay system based on performance. Based on the results of evaluations, teachers and administrators are rated as highly effective, effective, partially effective or ineffective. They then receive differentiated raises based on the ratings.

Many community members say the reforms caused a flight of quality educators.

The district's human resources department met with a group of teachers and administrators during the 2016-17 year to revise the CITE and LEAD rubrics. The district will allow teachers and administrators to get comfortable with the revised rubrics this school year. It will provide flat pay raises to employees rated “partially effective” and above in the 2018-19 school year. The amount will be decided next spring, when the district reviews its budget.

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