Committee pushes slate for Parker mayor, council

Committee for Hometown Colorado has 'Save PACE and Pine Curve' roots

Nick Puckett
npuckett@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 10/20/20

A new group has grown out of a local movement opposing new development in Parker, and it's making a big push to get four candidates elected in the municipal election. The Committee for Hometown …

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Committee pushes slate for Parker mayor, council

Committee for Hometown Colorado has 'Save PACE and Pine Curve' roots

Posted

A new group has grown out of a local movement opposing new development in Parker, and it's making a big push to get four candidates elected in the municipal election.

The Committee for Hometown Colorado is a newly registered political committee with the stated purpose to “assist in electing conservative candidates to office throughout Colorado regardless of party affiliation.” The group is endorsing a slate of three town council candidates, Fritz Freund, Laura Hefta and Nate Matthews, and mayoral candidate Jeff Toborg, a current councilmember.

The committee has circulated fliers and online advertisements supporting the four candidates with photos of each of them.

The town's donation limit for individual contributions is $500 per candidate and $500 per issue.

Committee agent Lucile Lord declined to comment for this article.

Hometown Colorado has been financed solely by Parker residents, including some leaders of the 2019 “Save PACE Parking and Pine Curve” committee, and had raised $3,800 as of Sept. 30.

The “Save PACE Parking and Pine Curve” committee, known for their royal blue T-shirts around Parker, advocated to rezone two downtown properties to open space in 2019. Toborg and fellow Councilmember Cheryl Poage supported the group's cause, against the council majority. Poage and Toborg did not believe the town's My Mainstreet Project, in which the town received feedback from residents regarding how they think five downtown properties should be developed, truly represented what residents wanted. The five properties include the 24-acre Pine Curve lot at the east end of downtown and the strip of land north of the Parker Arts, Culture and Events Center.

Poage donated $300 to Hometown Colorado.

The “Save PACE” group said its goal was to rezone two downtown properties to define them as open space, Pine Curve and the strip of land known as PACE Lot 2. Committee leaders strayed from that purpose, however, saying the end goal was to stall development to build the committee's own vision of what they called “smart development” on the properties.

During the public hearing process in summer 2019, council voted that Poage and Toborg held a conflict-of-interest because their support of the group exhibited pre-judgment.

One interested developer submitted a plan for the Pine Curve property, which town council, minus Poage and Toborg, rejected. Today, the property is off the market and remains undeveloped.

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