Get to know Parker's mayoral candidates

Three give reasons to claim best fit for job

Nick Puckett
npuckett@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 9/29/20

One thing is certain come November: Parker will have a new mayor and three new councilmembers. A fourth interim replacement to former councilmember Renee Williams should be established no later than …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2019-2020, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Get to know Parker's mayoral candidates

Three give reasons to claim best fit for job

Posted

One thing is certain come November: Parker will have a new mayor and at least two new councilmembers. A fourth interim replacement to former councilmember Renee Williams should be established no later than January, officials say.

The three mayoral candidates for the 2020 election are similar in one way: They see Parker needs a change. However, the question remains: What needs to be changed?

No one at the dais knew much of Jonathan Bollefer prior to the race, however, Bollefer doesn't mind. A proud outsider candidate, Bollefer says he will be the voice of the people lacking at Parker Town Hall.

Two-term Councilmember Joshua Rivero says Parker needs to communicate better. The business owner by day says he wants to seize the opportunity of increased numbers of residents who work from home by bringing business closer to residents.

Jeff Toborg, elected to town council in 2018, believes there is room to take stronger leadership at the mayoral position, despite the town's structure of a strong-town administrator government.

Early on, the race appeared to involve a fourth candidate, Town Councilmember Cheryl Poage. Poage dropped out, citing personal reasons, and supported her cohort Toborg. Since their election in 2018, Poage and Toborg have stuck together and acted as a de facto voice for the “Blue Shirt” Save Pine Curve committee in 2019.

Jonathan Bollefer

Bottom line: Bollefer is a director of a large corporate security firm in Denver who takes pride in his outsider status. “J.B.” is a Clarke Farms resident and former local business owner of Ascent Elevator. Bollefer's wife owns a Parker business as well, Altitude Cleaning Solutions. Bollefer is also a certified firearms instructor for concealed-carry weapons, taser instructor and de-escalation trainer, and said he wants to improve training and technology for the Parker Police Department. Bollefer says he brings a fresh perspective to an otherwise chummy town council. Bollefer says he has no agenda or ulterior motives.

He said it: “I don't have a lot of political affiliations or anything I'm involved in, and I'm glad about that. I don't want to come into this with a bias or agenda. I want to come into it with a clean slate … Giving a fresh perspective is really valuable to our town.”

Joshua Rivero

Bottom line: Rivero is a second-term member of the Parker Town Council, elected in 2012 and reelected in 2016 and a 31-year resident. Rivero owns Fika Coffee House in two Parker locations. Rivero says his chief goal is to reunite Parker. The coffee entrepreneur tells voters he is accessible, whenever they need to get in touch with him, and plans on holding town hall-type events for more face-to-face discussions with residents. Rivero says though he may not possess the same public charm of his two predecessors, he more than makes up for it when he can sit down with someone over a cup of coffee.

He said it: “The town councilmembers need to be the 'Six Musketeers.' It's the mayor's role to go out and say 'This is council's directive. This is the best thing for the town' … That's the beautiful thing about a town council, those six individual minds coming together to decide on whatever testimony they hear and reach a consensus. It's not to go out and say 'I stand on this and I'm going to die on this hill because this is what my people want.' That's not what they want.”

Jeff Toborg

Bottom line: Toborg, elected to Parker Town Council in 2018, pins himself as the candidate for change at the council dais. An IT professional by trade, Toborg is not secret about his close relationship with local leaders and says those relationships can benefit Parker, were he to become mayor. Toborg says he wants to repeal what he calls an “antiquated” grocery tax, bringing about $5 million in annual consumer saving, by Toborg's estimates—roughly $88 per resident. To achieve those goals, however, Toborg says he needs to establish a new role for the mayor: to steer the town's policies and vision.

He said it: “The role of the mayor has traditionally been to run the meeting, but my platform and my personality is to take charge and be an advocate for people …

“… The mayor is the presiding officer of the council and should be setting the agenda and direction, with council input — right, wrong or indifferent. We've had past mayors be the single point of contact for the town, but I want to take that in a new direction as mayor.”

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.