Last of major Parker housing developments underway

One of three Hess communities will see move-ins within a few months

Posted 9/17/19

The last major housing developments that will fit in Parker’s existing town boundaries are underway, and within a few years nearly 7,000 residential units will go up in more than 2,500 acres in the …

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Last of major Parker housing developments underway

One of three Hess communities will see move-ins within a few months

Posted

The last major housing developments that will fit in Parker’s existing town boundaries are underway, and within a few years nearly 7,000 residential units will go up in more than 2,500 acres in the southwest corner of town.

Dirt is already being moved on the east side of Crowfoot Valley Road for the Trails at Crowfoot development. Across the street and to the north will be the beginnings of the 1,100-acre Looking Glass, or Hess Ranch, development. North of that will be Anthology North, a 1,200-acre development with capacities for commercial uses and possibly a private primary or secondary school.

“The size of this development is unique in the Town of Parker,” said Paul Workman, the town’s senior planner. “To my knowledge, within the town boundaries, there hasn’t been a development of this size and the amount of residents it will bring to town.”

The Canterberry Crossing neighborhood, in comparison, consists of about 3,300 residential units.

At Trails at Crowfoot, 890 residential units are planned to be built. The Looking Glass development will have 2,490 units and Anthology North will have 3,305 units with at least 27 acres reserved for commercial, according Larry Jacobson of Front Range Communities, the developer putting on the Looking Glass project.

“Very rarely do you get the opportunity to work on a project of this size and scale, so professionally it’s very exciting to do that,” Workman said.

Planners expect the first residents to move into Trails at Crowfoot as early as January. The first housing units in the Looking Glass development will start to go up late 2020 with the first move-in expected spring 2021. Anthology will build out last of the three at a date to be determined.

“Hess Ranch and Anthology North are one of the last remaining major developments that will remain in the town boundaries,” Workman said. “They’re so large, geographically, and they’re right next to each other so there’s a lot of shared vision in how those developments interact along those shared boundaries.”

A range of residential units from single-family custom homes to duplexes to age-restricted senior housing are possible in the new neighborhoods.

The Trails at Crowfoot development will eventually have 68 duplex homes, and 136 single-family homes in the $400,000s.

A mix of townhomes and one-story and two-story homes will make up the Looking Glass development. Every house will have brick or stone and/or wood exteriors with “attractive elevations,” Jacobson said. The first phase will consist of housing styles that are more traditional to neighborhoods in and around Parker. Long-term, there will be a variety of looks from townhomes to custom homes.

“It won’t divert significantly from what’s in the town already,” Jacobson said.

Jacobson said much thought was given to providing open space and trail connections in its communities. More than 280 acres of open space and 20-plus miles of trails have been allotted for the Looking Glass development, Jacobson said.

“That really forms the backbone of the community,” Jacobson said. “Maybe 20, 30 years ago this property would have had a golf course and less open space, but the golf course would function as the open space. That just doesn’t work anymore. No. 1, it’s not what people want. There are enough golf courses in the vicinity. And, No. 2, this is much more sustainable.”

Community centers, libraries and schools are permitted upon a special review in Anthology North, according to the planning document. Single-family homes and a senior living facility are permitted to build there.

Anthology North also has room for mixed-use development for things like retail, restaurants, personal services, entertainment and general office.

“The Denver metro region is growing and will continue to grow,” Workman said. “Not only the metro area, Douglas County will continue to grow. Parker will continue to grow. So, it’s about how do we responsibly try and manage and focus that development, and each community does that in their own unique way?”

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