Lemonade entrepreneurs earn while they learn

Dozens participated in an area-wide Lemonade Day Aug. 24

Posted 8/27/19

Brothers Blaise and Jarrett Snavely, 9 and 11, know how to turn a profit. The two are constantly coming up with ways to earn a buck, or, in this case, a couple quarters. On a sunny Saturday morning, …

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Lemonade entrepreneurs earn while they learn

Dozens participated in an area-wide Lemonade Day Aug. 24

Posted

Brothers Blaise and Jarrett Snavely, 9 and 11, know how to turn a profit. The two are constantly coming up with ways to earn a buck, or, in this case, a couple quarters.

On a sunny Saturday morning, Aug. 24, the two set up a lemonade stand on the corner of South Pikes Peak Drive and Mainstreet. With white aprons and friendly smiles, they waited for customers. Lemonade was only part of their menu. The brothers served gumballs from a machine Jarrett bought with his birthday money and snow cones from a machine Blaise found at a garage sale for $2.

Jarrett said he enjoys putting the product together and counting the money at the end of the day to see how close he is to moving into the black.

“We do a lot of math to practice our adding and subtracting and multiplying so we get at it in our heads so we don't have to use calculators,” Jarrett said.

The Snavely brothers' stand was just one of dozens of similar stands that took over the Parker area for Lemonade Day, a nationwide campaign dedicated to teaching kids entrepreneurship. Children registered to participate and garnered support from local businesses throughout Aurora, Lone Tree, Centennial and Parker. There are 76 Lemonade Day events nationwide and six international events. This was the first and only Lemonade Day in Colorado.

To mom, Carolyn, Lemonade Day was a great opportunity for her homeschooled students to put their skills to the test.

“Jarrett and Blaise are very much organizers. They did a bunch of this on their own and thought up all the things they needed and put it together,” Carolyn said. “It's great to see them thriving and see them using all their skills they learned in schools and interacting.”

Ruby Robinson and Aubryn Hunter, both 9, met in class at Prairie Crossing Elementary. One day, Robinson went to Hunter's house for a play date, and the first thing the two did was make a lemonade stand. It's one of Hunter's favorite things to do. Her stand, set up in front of Dough Dreamery on Mainstreet, served pink and yellow lemonade for a customizable price. She hopes to save up to buy a new Barbie doll.

“One day I was just bored, so I asked my mom if could make a lemonade stand because I wanted money and I really wanted a new doll,” Hunter said.

Jeremy Brinsfield, 10, set up just outside the Parker Shoppes with jugs of yellow and pink lemonade, and a cooler full of bottled water with flavor pouches to mix.

Brinsfield was the owner-operator of this stand, but he didn't go at it without a little help from his family. He hired his dad as a sign spinner to direct traffic from Parker Road toward the shop. His toddler sister occasionally helped with the money or handing customers lemonade.

Brinsfield was trying to raise money for a trip to Washington, D.C. Though business was slow, Brinsfield was optimistic. This was his first lemonade stand. He hoped to earn enough money to donate to the Ronald McDonald Foundation, which provides resources for families with sick kids.

He said he sees it as his way of giving back to the community.

“I think everyone deserves to have a chance in life to live and see what they have to do,” Brinsfield said.

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