Meet Parker's 'Cookie Dough Queen'

Melissa Grosboll opens up about her new shop on Mainstreet

Posted 7/22/19

Melissa Grosboll is known to some as the “Cookie Dough Queen.” People have known Grosboll to serve them a sample cup of raw cookie dough and a spoon at the Parker Farmer's Market. Her Dough …

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Meet Parker's 'Cookie Dough Queen'

Melissa Grosboll opens up about her new shop on Mainstreet

Posted

Melissa Grosboll is known to some as the “Cookie Dough Queen.”

People have known Grosboll to serve them a sample cup of raw cookie dough and a spoon at the Parker Farmer's Market. Her Dough Dreamery edible cookie dough is served at The Local in downtown Parker and at the Streets at SouthGlenn in Centennial. By August, Grosboll will open the doors to her cookie dough shop at 19751 E. Mainstreet by the same name.

It's a tantalizing product, but the thought of cookie dough in a cup with a spoon provokes echoes of mom warning you not to eat the gooey raw treat. Grosboll's cookie dough was made to never go in the oven, though it can. Hers was meant to be eaten with a spoon.

Using pasteurized instead of unpasteurized eggs eliminates the risk of contracting a food-borne illness from salmonella, according to the FDA. Grosboll also uses a special heat-treated flour that eliminates the risk of E. coli, she said, citing various online recipes.

Grosboll has a history with cookie dough, from her stressful college days and when she was a little girl helping her mother bake. By her standards, the safe-to-eat stuff tastes even better than the real thing.

“It brings people back to a simpler time when they were young, licking the beater,” Grosboll said.

Colorado Community Media met with Grosboll to talk about her dream as Parker's "Cookie Dough Queen."

How did you get into the cookie dough business?

I've lived in Parker for 16 years. I love the community here. I'm on Mainstreet all the time. I'm a retired chiropractor. I retired at the end of last year and I wanted to do something else with the second half of my life. My daughter graduated from high school and took off, so it's just my husband and I. I wanted to do something different. I heard about this concept from another organization that started this on the other side of the country. I don't even know where it came from, but out of my mouth came "I can do this."

I've been a baker my whole life. I tell people I'm a good cook but I'm a great baker. I loved to bake with my grandmother as a kid. She always used to let me lick the beaters. That was always my favorite thing. In college, during stressful times, taking the tube of cookie dough and eating it. Who doesn't love cookie dough?

What makes this place different?

When I started this (Dough Dreamery) I really wanted there to be a community piece to it. In the age of social media, we are becoming less and less social because we sit in our homes, in front of our computers, we order everything from our computers and have it delivered to us and never leave our house. We're becoming more and more isolated as a population. I wanted to do something about that. I wanted to create a community environment, a place where people can get out of their homes…

I just want to bring back that sense of community. Parker is such a community-oriented town. It still has that small-town feel, especially this downtown area. We have the Parker wine walk, we now have the art walk once a month and parades and all kinds of things going on that bring people out of their homes and into this community. I really wanted to be a part of that...

... We really wanted to wrap this around a cause. Our cause is mental health awareness and removing the stigma of mental illness. Right now we are partnering with an organization in Lakewood that helps at-risk youth get into treatment for suicide risk, and we're looking for more partnerships like that, possibly even closer to Parker. Our mission is to bring joy into the lives of as many people as possible. It's two-fold. There's the joy of cookie dough for people in the community… but also to bring some joy into the lives of those who have none. We want to help make an impact on that.

What should people expect when they walk in the door?

Here in the shop it's going to be more along the lines of the ice cream shop model. We're going to have a big container of different flavors of cookie dough. You can get different flavors, toppings on it. We'll have cookies and brownies and baked goods. We'll also have cookie dough milkshakes, cookie dough sandwiches, cookie dough bites, ice cream sandwiches and all things cookie dough-related. We'll also have product people can take and go.

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