My Name is … Scott Nordstrom

Local philanthropist called to help orphaned children

Nick Puckett
npuckett@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 1/7/20

About me I grew up in northern Colorado, a small town called Johnstown. I went to the University of Colorado and met my wife there. We've had opportunities to live all over the country, like Las …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2019-2020, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

My Name is … Scott Nordstrom

Local philanthropist called to help orphaned children

Posted

About me

I grew up in northern Colorado, a small town called Johnstown. I went to the University of Colorado and met my wife there. We've had opportunities to live all over the country, like Las Vegas, Tucson (Arizona), Florida, but we call this home. We've got three kids, our oldest is 25 and youngest is 18. My wife and I have been married for 29 years.

I operate Global Orphan Relief Fund, a nonprofit to serve underprivileged children on a global scale.

Global Orphan Relief Fund

(Global Orphan) is a faith-based movement that provides care for orphaned children. We do that in a number of ways: with home-base care, scholarships and nutrition. Those are the three primary areas in which we serve children. Today, we're serving just under 1,300 kids.

What inspired us

(My wife and I) started in 2005. Through a series of events, we were blessed with our fourth child named Faith. The process of having her and losing her that same year exposed us to the needs of orphaned children throughout the world. We felt called and compelled to step out and do something. It's not like we're experts now. We know a little bit more now about how to best serve children. We've served all over the world since then and we do what we can to help a child. Life is tough enough, so for a child that has lost a parent or both parents, especially in the parts of the world we serve, these children are up against it. We try to provide a helping hand, whether that's a full-fledged home or allowing the child to continue in their education. That's important and foundational in terms of turning to adulthood.

Serving more kids than ever before

Today we're serving 852 children in South Sudan. We're serving 36% of the total children in need at these five schools. I'd love to feed all of these children, but we're simply doing what we can with the funding available.

What we do is we have a campus of homes and a widow, who is the house mom, and children who live there and they become a family.

Our homes are local, we don't want to transport a child away from their extended family. We want them to be part of the culture and their extended family because they're not going to live at the orphanage forever. It might be more expensive than a traditional orphanage.

How to help orphans in need

Doing something is better than doing nothing, but it's not easy and it's not always straightforward.

God is going to direct you and you're going to learn from any mistakes that you might make, but between you and God you're going to be directed in such a way you can be effective in the orphan field.

There's no first step, second step and third step. Certainly, (people) can engage our organization if they want to. A lot of our partners volunteer, some are on the board, but a lot of our partners provide funding. And there are personalities that prefer putting their hands to the work and there's nothing wrong with that.

I think it's easy for people to think that someone else is going to do something. It's easy to think UNICEF (the United Nations Children's Fund) is going to care for these kids or someone else is going to save the children. With an organization like G-O, it's a little bit more grassroots. Being engaged with a movement like G-O you can have a lot more impact whether it's your time or money, if it's impacting children in a positive way.

If you have a suggestion for who should be featured in the next My Name is contact Nick Puckett at npuckett@coloradocommunitymedia.com

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.