New housing on the horizon

Several developments are taking shape around Parker

Posted 12/21/15

Work has begun on several new housing projects in Parker.

While colder temperatures take hold, construction is just heating up. Several developments are being considered for approval, going through the necessary steps to prove that the project …

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New housing on the horizon

Several developments are taking shape around Parker

Posted

Work has begun on several new housing projects in Parker.

While colder temperatures take hold, construction is just heating up. Several developments are being considered for approval, going through the necessary steps to prove that the project complies with all town standards.

The following is an update on three ongoing developments.

Overlook at Cherry Creek


Construction is underway on the Overlook at Cherry Creek, a development adjacent to the portion of Clarke Farms that's southeast of Mainstreet and Motsenbocker Road.

Town council approved a final plat in July 2015 to create three filings within the Overlook at Cherry Creek for a total of 186 single-family detached lots on 63 acres. Significant grading work has been underway since September to smooth out the rough topography.

In 2013, the town granted a request from the landowner to rezone the property and remove language that allowed for apartments. The previous owner had planned to build an 844-unit age-restricted retirement village.

At that time, some nearby homeowners inquired about potential impacts to home values and traffic congestion on nearby roads.

Rhonda Miracle, whose backyard is adjacent to the project, said the grading has caused significant disturbances, including excessive noise, dust and vibrations that shake her house. Miracle said she is concerned that greed is prompting local officials to approve new projects, and worries that Parker will become “another Highlands Ranch.”

United Development Companies LLC, a Denver-based real estate development firm, sold the project in July to MDC Holdings, which is affiliated with Richmond American Homes. There was no response to a request for more information from the builder.

The project stretches from the power station at the Motsenbocker Road curve near Todd Drive on the south, to Mainstreet on the north. Bar CCC Park is to the east. The land was once owned by the Parker Water and Sanitation District and, at one point in the mid-1990s, was going to be turned into a golf course.

Stroh Crossing

Town council approved a sketch and preliminary plan in early November for Stroh Crossing, a development that proposes 91 single-family homes on 53 acres on the northeast corner of South Parker Road and Stroh Road.

The average lot size will be 8,000 square feet and the homes will primarily be built in the central and eastern portions of the site. The mixture of ranch and two-story homes will range in size from 2,300 square feet to 4,000 square feet.

Stroh Crossing includes two acres of active-use park land and an additional 1.5 acres of passive use park, which exceeds the 2.1 acres of park land required by the town. The parks will feature trails and trail connections, a playground and a pavilion near the high point of the property.

The approved sketch/preliminary plan contains provisions for five commercial lots adjacent to Parker Road and one commercial lot along Stroh Road. Each lot will be roughly two acres and allow for a mixture of retail, office and restaurant commercial uses.

The land had previously been designated for 300,000 square feet of retail and 80,000 square feet of office uses. In 2013, the developer proposed building 135 homes and 8.4 acres of retail/commercial.

Neighbors to the development have raised concerns about potential impacts. Homeowners in the Butterfield subdivision said the lot sizes proposed for Stroh Crossing are not compatible with their 5-acre lots

In 2013, Butterfield HOA president Bill Lundell pleaded for “meaningful” concessions on housing density, a transition between neighborhoods and traffic. The developer recently said it conducted “mitigation meetings” with the neighboring communities to “maintain year-round buffers, noise and light reduction and traffic issues,” according to public documents.

In November, a representative said a neighborhood meeting was held, but no one from the Butterfield subdivision was present.

Watermark apartment project


Town council approved a use-by-special-review request Dec. 7 for an apartment development that needed permission to exceed the limit of 10 dwelling units per acre.

Watermark is proposing the construction of 294 units on 18.5 acres between Twenty Mile and Dransfeldt roads and south of Sulphur Gulch. The three unplatted parcels of land consist of a fire-damaged one-story ranch home, an unoccupied greenhouse and an equipment building.

The limit within the “Greater Downtown District: Market Center,” where the three properties lie, is 10 dwelling units per acre. The Watermark proposal carries a net unit density of 19 dwelling units per acre.

The plan provides ground floor space for commercial and retail use along Twenty Mile Road; if approved, there will be 5,300 square feet of retail and 5,300 square feet of “workout space,” according to the application submitted to town planners.

Parker planning staff found the development is “in harmony and compatible with” nearby multi-family developments, including the just-built Vanterra Apartments, Parker Assisted Living by Morningstar, and the Briargate Apartments, the latter of which has a density of 17 units per acre, the public documents said. Planner Ryan McGee recommended approval of the application.

The application alluded to nearby commercial uses — referring to Super Target — that are “more intense in character” and it noted the proximity of some apartments to the loading docks on the northwest corner of the Super Target building. The developer agreed to mitigate noise impacts to units closest to the docks.

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