Parker man accused of selling hundreds of fake vaccination cards, faces federal charges

Olivia Prentzel
The Colorado Sun
Posted 4/20/22

A Parker man produced and sold hundreds of fake COVID-19 vaccination cards to people in more than a dozen states, with help from a co-conspirator who worked in the defense industry and had a Top …

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Parker man accused of selling hundreds of fake vaccination cards, faces federal charges

Posted

A Parker man produced and sold hundreds of fake COVID-19 vaccination cards to people in more than a dozen states, with help from a co-conspirator who worked in the defense industry and had a Top Secret security clearance, according to a federal complaint. 

Robert Van Camp faces federal charges of conspiracy and trafficking counterfeit goods in an alleged business scheme he ran for about a year, according to the complaint filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Denver. He made thousands of dollars selling the cards that were allegedly “visually indistinguishable” from legitimate vaccination record cards designed and distributed by the CDC. 

Van Camp and his co-conspirator, who is not named in the federal complaint, used an electronic copy of a blank COVID-19 vaccination record card that looked identical to official vaccination cards, the complaint said. Van Camp included the official government logos of both the U.S. Department of Human Health Services and the CDC and used false information about vaccination dates, vaccination providers, vaccination sites and vaccination lot numbers.

Federal agents searched the trash at his and his co-conspirator’s Parker home in October and found crumpled handwritten documents, including one  titled “Card List” that included the names of individuals and the quantity of cards ordered. He also sold cards to four federal undercover agents, the complaint said. 

Van Camp, a resident of both Parker and Bulverde, Texas, published magazines which contained ads and promotions from various businesses. He headed two business networking associations called Parker Best Leads Group and Castle Rock Best Leads Group, according to the complaint.

At least one witness, who attended a networking meeting led by Van Camp, heard Van Camp say he had “inside knowledge” about COVID-19 vaccination cards because of his co-conspirator’s security clearance, the complaint said. That person saw Van Camp with a two-inch stack of fraudulent cards, offering to sell them for $17 to $20 each. 

Another witness, who also attended one of the meetings, confronted Van Camp after seeing him with a pile of fake cards and said that he should not be selling them, according to the complaint. Van Camp allegedly responded that he did not care what the witness thought. 

Van Camp also made sales in numerous states through email, text and phone, according to the complaint, including to federal employees who were required to be vaccinated against COVID-19 under the federal employee vaccination requirement. 

In September 2021, Van Camp sold five fraudulent cards — charging $120 per card — to an undercover federal agent in or near Castle Rock, the federal complaint said. 

“I kinda have a hookup on the real, real ‘V’ card, you know what I’m saying?” Van Camp reportedly told the agent. “Like I can hook you and all of your employees up so if anybody asks you can show them the card. I have done it for about 700 of my customers.” 

He told the agent he had sold the fake vaccination cards to people who were traveling to the Tokyo Olympics, including three Olympians and their coach and people traveling internationally.

“So until I get caught and go to jail, (expletive) it, I’m taking the money! I don’t care. I’ve saved a thousand lives,” he said, according to the complaint. “And what they’re doing is wrong, we know this, so how is what I’m doing wrong? I’m just kinda fixing this wrong is all I’m doing. It’s not like I’m making hundred-dollar bills.” 

He told another federal agent that he was making between 30 to 40 cards a night and that making the cards was a full-time job. 

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